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  • HITEC Special: Does EU GDPR Affect U.S. Hospitality Companies?

    By Alvaro Hidalgo. The EU General Data Protection Regulation has set a path towards protecting personal data which many other countries will follow. In a global industry such as hospitality, it should be a primary objective to take the steps towards compliance.

  • What to Expect at HITEC Houston 2018: Elite Education, Exhibits, E20X and More

    HOUSTON: A booming cosmopolitan city that is home to more than 2 million Texans, NASA’s famous Johnson Space Center, and — in just two short months — the world’s largest hospitality exhibition HITEC®.

  • HFTP Report: Hospitality Data Security — Strategy for Data Protection and Regulation Compliance

    This guide from Hospitality Financial and Technology Professionals (HFTP(R)) covers safeguards that can be implemented in hospitality businesses today, tips on how to continuously improve security and data regulation compliance.

  • HFTP GDPR Guidelines: Privacy Policies for Hotels

    This document offers points to consider in the development of a hotel’s privacy policy. In view of the multiple organisational and legal structures under which hotels operate, as well as the complexity of the third party landscape that may be part of the complete guest experience, this document serves as a guideline only.

Tackling GDPR compliance before time runs out | mckinsey.com

McKinsey & Company ·16 August 2017
Europe is on the brink of a sea change in its data-protection laws. In fact, when the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) takes effect on May 25, 2018, the effects will reverberate far beyond the continent itself. The GDPR goes further than harmonizing national data-protection laws across the European Union and simplifying compliance; it also expands the reach of EU data-protection regulation and introduces important new requirements. It seeks to ensure that personal data are protected against misuse and theft and to give European Union residents control over how data relating to them are being used. Any entity that is established in the European Union or that processes the personal data of EU residents in order to offer them goods or services or to monitor their behavior--whether as customers, employees, or business partners--will be affected. Any failure to comply with the regulation could incur severe reputational damage as well as financial penalties of up to 4 percent of annual worldwide revenues (see sidebar "The GDPR: Key facts" for a synopsis of the new rules).

Cracking The World's Biggest Business-Travel Market

McKinsey & Company ·13 July 2016
Asia accounts for more than a third of the world's $1 trillion business-travel sector, and the region's growth is accelerating. Do you understand its customers?Asia is the world's biggest market for business travel, accounting for 38 percent of about $1 trillion in annual spending.1 And in the next few years, its importance will only grow, as the market is expected to expand four times as quickly as the North American market and more than twice as fast as the European market.2With Asia's position growing, the industry must work harder to understand the needs of the Asian business traveler, which we define as those based in the region. To help get a clear picture of the needs of this important segment, we surveyed more than 2,500 business travelers in China, India, Indonesia, Japan, and Singapore and interviewed 19 corporate-travel managers in various industries in the region. In addition, we analyzed the booking and spending patterns of Asia's business travelers, using data provided by Amadeus and Visa.The study underscored nuances that must be addressed to gain these travelers' business. Three stand out. First, Asia's business travelers are gaining greater autonomy in their travel decisions, making it critical to address their preferences, not just those of their employers. Second, they value convenience above all else. And finally, Asia's business travelers can be divided into four archetypes, each with its own distinct set of needs and preferences.Asian business travelers are gaining greater autonomyBusiness travelers in Asia have an unexpected degree of autonomy when making travel plans, especially in areas such as booking flights and hotels. Our survey found that 69 percent of respondents are able to choose their airlines, either from a preapproved list or without restrictions. In fact, this included 11 percent with no constraints on either provider or price. Similarly, 74 percent of respondents said they have the same degree of freedom in picking a hotel, of which 9 percent said they have no restrictions whatsoever.

An executive's guide to the Internet of Things | mckinsey.com

McKinsey & Company · 8 April 2016
and even, in a sense, to collaborate--they create game-changing opportunities: production efficiency, distribution, and innovation all stand to benefit immensely. While the consumer's adoption of fitness bands and connected household appliances might generate more media buzz, the potential for business usage is much greater. Research from the McKinsey Global Institute suggests that the operational efficiencies and greater market reach IoT affords will create substantial value in many industries.2 (For more, see the video "What's the one piece of advice for a business leader interested in the Internet of Things?" And to see how experts believe the Internet of Things will evolve, see "The Internet of Things: Five critical questions.")

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